5 KonMari Principles to Move Easier - Best REI

I recently visited with my friend, Sue Fehlberg, with Tidy Nest, about tips to help folks get organized, whether they were staying in their homes or moving to a new ones. Here’s her video tips, and I’ve added a synopsis below the video. Sorry for the fuzzy video, it just isn’t perfect every time.

Sue Fehlberg, Tidy Nest

Here’s Sue’s 5 Tips:

    1. Imagine Your Ideal Life

What did you like about your previous home? What could you do without? Think about what will most support your daily routine. It can also help to make a vision or Pinterest board to narrow down what decorating styles you like. Once you come up with a concrete vision for your new place, decision making becomes 100 times easier. 

2. Finish Discarding Before You Pack

This is a good time to do some major decluttering. Deciding whether or not something sparks joy becomes much more significant when you add “does this spark enough joy for me and my loved ones to heave it up 3 floors?”

3. Pack By Category

Pull everything out from each cabinet and drawer and corral them into one area, organized by category. It makes it easy to pack up boxes when all the items from each category are collected first, rather than packing room by room. This cuts down enormously on “misc’ boxes filled with odds and ends, or mixing different categories of objects together. And that in turn makes unpacking much easier!

4. Find a Place for Everything

Really think about your daily routine. Make sure the things you use frequently are easy to access, and do your best to be intentional about where you store each item. Don’t be tempted to buy storage solutions and furniture to fill up your new space! You’ll find you most likely have all the storage you need anyway, and it’s much cheaper in the long run.

5. Ask Yourself if it Sparks Joy

Moving can create a need for a lot of practical items. It really helps when you’re purchasing to make sure that every single item sparks joy. It can be tempting to get the cheapest, easiest options for everything – but then imagine your future self using those products for months and months. And for more permanent objects – like measuring cups – it won’t be months and months but YEARS and YEARS that you’ll be using those objects. Buying ‘okay’ things instead of things you really love just leads to regret and probably repurchasing in the future. 

Author, Sue Fehlberg, Tidy Nest website, Tidy Nest on Facebook